Friday, February 27, 2015

Read On Wisconsin Titles for March

The Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association is a sponsor of Read On Wisconsin (ROW), which is a literacy program highlighting top-notch reads for youth of all ages in our state.  

Discussion questions, selected booktrailers, forums and resources for librarians and teachers to use in promoting these titles are available at the Read On Wisconsin website. Consider featuring these titles in storytimes, programs, or displays. Children and teens can even make booktrailers for sharing on the ROW website. Guidelines, technical tips and examples are available here.



March 2015 Read on Wisconsin Titles:


Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Books
Which Is Round? Which Is Bigger? by Mineko Mamada. Translated from the Japanese by Yvette Ghione. U.S. edition: Kids Can Press, 2013.
All the World by Liz Garton Scanlon. Illustrated by Marla Frazee. Beach Lane, 2009.


Primary (K-2) Books
No Monkeys, No Chocolate by Melissa Stewart and Allen Young. Illustrated by Nicole Wong. Charlesbridge, 2013.


Intermediate (Grades 3-5) Books
H.O.R.S.E.: A Game of Basketball and Imagination by Christopher Myers. Egmont, 2012.
Hoop Genius: How a Desperate Teacher and a Rowdy Gym Class Invented Basketball by John Coy. Illustrated by Joe Morse. Carolrhoda, 2013.


Middle School Books
March: Book One by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin. Illustrated by Nate Powell. Top Shelf, 2013.
Imprisoned: The Betrayal of Japanese Americans during World War II by Martin W. Sandler. Walker, 2013.


High School Books
The Nazi Hunters: How a Team of Spies and Survivors Captured the World’s Most Notorious Nazi by Neal Bascomb. Arthur A. Levine Books / Scholastic Inc., 2013.
I See the Promised Land: A Life of Martin Luther King, Jr. by Arthur Flowers. Illustrated by Manu Chitrakar. Designed by Guglielmo Rossi. Groundwood Books / House of Anansi Press, 2013.

Dyslexia Conference in April

The Wisconsin Branch of The International Dyslexia Association (WIBIDA) is having their Spring Conference on Saturday, April 18, 2015 at the Tundra Lodge in Green Bay, WI. The focus of the day will be "Assistive Technology for people with Dyslexia and Dysgraphia." The audience for this conference includes parents, educators, tutors, and others interested in learning about this topic. For more information, visit their website

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

YSS wants YOU to know!

In the second* in a series of educational webinars we are coordinating with library systems for youth librarians in the state, Teen Services is the focus.  These free CE opportunities feature WLA YSS members who are also amazing youth services librarians sharing tips, programs and more to help all of us improve services.  
 
Additional upcoming webinars this year include one on school age services, one on partnerships and one on the secrets of great youth collection development (no, it’s not all about buying new books!).  We also have four more webinars waiting in the wings! YSS is the proud sponsor of these webinars and hope you not only benefit from them but consider becoming a member of WLA and the YSS section where change for youth in WI happens!
 
YSS Powerhouse Presents: Teen Services Okay? Better Than Okay!
Join us for a webinar on Mar 31, 2015 at 1:00 PM CDT.
Sponsored and presented by Nicolet Federated Library System
 
Register now!
 
Does it sometimes feel as if teens are from another planet? Speaking a different language? Three WLA Youth Services Section member librarians share their triumphs and tribulations in serving teens, with practical tips and examples on programming, great displays, and teen volunteers. After this webinar you'll feel better than Okay about your teen services – you'll feel great! Join panelists Terry Ehle, Youth Services Coordinator, Lester Public Library, Two rivers; Emily Heideman, Teen Services Librarian, Waupaca Area Library; and Becky Arenivar, Programming Specialist, Prescott Public Library and power up.
 
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar from Nicolet Federated library System.
 
*the first was Storytime 101 and you can view the webinar here at the SCLS website. Soon we will have a space on our YSS website with all the webinars archived together. Stay tuned!

Monday, February 23, 2015

Calling all YSS Members!

Calendar.jpg 
Oh, hello fellow members of the Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association! We may be looking for your help:
  • Do you love working with preschoolers?
  • Do you share early literacy tips with your families and parents?
  • Are you willing to help contribute to our cool YSS project from the comfort of your own library?
Then get in touch with us!

We are about to start work on the 2016 YSS Early Literacy Calendar and we want you!

Each month of the calendar is filled with ideas and activities to bring alive the 5 ECRR (Every Child Ready to Read) practices  - PLAY, TALK, READ, SING, WRITE - plus math, art and science ideas for parents and their preschoolers. Suggestions for activities, ideas and books fill each unique month.

We have twelve YSS members each provide one month of content. It's fast, easy, fun and quick.

If you think you would like to be part of this fun crowd-sourced project, please get in touch with project leaders Betsy Bromley at bbromley@cooney.lib.wi.us  or Katherine Elchert, katherineelchert@ricelakegov.org before  March 31 to express interest. We'll be tapping folks immediately to meet a May 15 deadline!

Go YSS folks!!!!

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Graphic Novel Collection Assist...er Lists

While we certainly have some graphic novel aficianados in our ranks, I am a print book person myself. I respect the genre and understand its appeal for visual readers, but appreciate the help of those more well-rounded in its selection than myself. That's where ALSC, YALSA, and the CCBC come in handy. The knowledgable folks there have compiled lists and resources for those of us who want a little assistance selecting the "best" graphic novels for our collections. Here's where you can find those lists:

ALSC Graphic Novels Reading List 2014

YALSA's Great Graphic Novels

CCBC's Graphic Novels Resources

One of the things I like best about the CCBC's resource list is that it also includes information and articles to help grow an understanding and appreciation of graphic novels in libraries.

What resources do you use for developing your graphic novel collections?

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Seuss-tastic Reading Challenge for March

Brought to you by Terry Ehle at Lester Public Library

Passive programs are the best, especially programs that encourage patrons to read. A few years back I saw an idea for a Dr. Seuss reading challenge (I’m sorry I can’t remember where I found the idea.) that we adapted for my library.


This is how the program worked. Any patron 18 years and younger could participate. All participants received a bingo-like sheet with silly Seuss inspired reading activities. Read out loud, Read upside down, Read under a table, Read to someone small, etc. When a participant had 5 in a row in any direction, they could bring their sheet back to the library and receive a free book. Complete all of the activities and pick 2 books.

I do buy books to give away but I also receive donations of gently used books throughout the year that I keep to use as prizes. Honestly I think patrons would participate for a sticker. Attached is my reading sheet, if you would like to have the publisher file so that you can personalize it, shoot me an email: tehle@lesterlibrary.org I am happy to share!

Monday, February 16, 2015

Wisconsin AfterSchool Association Conference Coming Up in April

The Wisconsin AfterSchool Association's conference is coming up on Friday and Saturday, April 10 and 11, 2015 and will be held at the Heidel House Resort and Spa in Green Lake, WI. More information about the association can be found on their website. You can register here.

Also, if you like their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/WisconsinAfterschoolAssociation you'll be entered for a chance to win a free membership and can stay up-to date on all the latest information.

Friday, February 13, 2015

Community Partnership in Tomahawk

Brought to you by Annette Miller at Tomahawk Public Library

One of my goals for 2015 was to reach out to our local Kinship organization and see if we could maybe do a program with the kids and their mentors.  Their Assistant Director is a library user.  So, I visited with her about this and we decided to start by doing something for the month of February.  

I gave her some information to use about the library and this flyer is what she came up with!  

We've only had a few people come in to date, but the best thing about this so far is that a mentor told me she was so grateful for this idea because she and her kinskid read all the time at home, but never thought to come to the library together. 

I just thought I'd share this because it's important to search out partnerships in our community and to try to find more ways to reach kids and remind them that their library is here for them.

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Bookmarks for Early Literacy Practices with Babies

Saroj Ghoting, an early childhood literacy consultant and author of several books about storytimes, shared a link on the ALSC listserv to a set of downloadable bookmarks to share with parents and other caregivers. The bookmarks have tips that cover the early literacy practices of talk, sing, read, and play. Developed by the Family Reading Partnership, the bookmarks are available here.

Monday, February 9, 2015

Kids Programming Online

Today, I'd like to highlight a resource for librarians in Wisconsin and elsewhere about children's programming especially suited to creatively making the most of limited time and budgets:

Kids Library Program Mojo  the blog based on the discussions and projects from online CE course Power Children's Programming on a Budget taught by Marge Loch-Wouters through the School of Library and Information Studies at the UW Madison.

From program outlines to schools as partners, from the rewards of youth programming to managing parents, there is inspiration at hand. I picked up a few tips in just a brief scan which include building a resource collection of go-to blogs for songs, fingerplays or craft ideas instead of conducting lengthy Google or Pinterest searches which may or may not produce usable results; benefits of passive programs complete with ideas I can incorporate in my small library; and how other librarians are handling the delicate balancing act between programming, planning, and outreach.

What are your go-to blogs or resources?